People: Evolution And Virulence

Maciej F Boni

Associate Professor of Biology
Human influenza epidemiology and evolution, evaluating population-level malaria treatment strategies with individual-based microsimulation models, phylogenetic analysis of avian influenza evolution in southern Vietnam, economic epidemiology of avian influenza, evaluating population-level efficacy of a potential dengue vaccine with mathematical models

Edward Dudley

Professor of Food Science; Director of E. coli Reference Center
Mechanisms driving toxin production in Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli; use of genome sequencing to track pathogen transmission during foodborne outbreaks

Matthew Ferrari

Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics; Huck Career Development Professor; Professor of Biology
Public Health, Quantitative Epidemiology, Population Ecology, Statistics, Computational and Mathematical Biology

Christina Grozinger

Director of the Center for Pollinator Research; Director of the Insect Biodiversity Center; Publius Vergilius Maro Professor and Huck Scholar of Entomology
Genomics of social behavior and health in bees

David R Hunter

Professor of Statistics, Department Head
I work on statistical models for networks, mixture models, and certain optimization algorithms called MM algorithms. A full list of papers and related work, such as software, may be found at http://sites.stat.psu.edu/~dhunter/.

David Kennedy

Assistant Professor of Biology
Ecology and evolution of infectious diseases, with particular interest in how disease dynamics influence pathogen emergence, virulence evolution, and drug or vaccine resistance.

Jasna Kovac

Lester Earl and Veronica Casida Career Development Professor of Food Safety; Assistant Professor of Food Science
Integrating epidemiological, microbiological, molecular and omics methods to better understand microbial pathogenic potential, antimicrobial resistance, and epidemiology of foodborne pathogens.

Jesse Lasky

Associate Professor of Biology
Ecological and evolutionary genomics, genetic and ecophysiological basis of adaptation to environmental stress, evolutionary ecology of biological complexity.

Elizabeth McGraw

Professor and Huck Scholar in Entomology
The genetics of vector, pathogen and symbiont interactions.

George Perry

Chair, Intercollege Graduate Degree Program in Bioinformatics and Genomics; Associate Professor of Anthropology and Biology
Anthropological genomics, paleogenomics, human body size evolution, parasite evolution, and evolutionary medicine.

Andrew Read

Director, Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences; Evan Pugh Professor of Biology and Entomology; Eberly Professor of Biotechnology
The ecology and evolutionary genetics of infectious disease.

Troy Sutton

Assistant Professor of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Animal models of influenza; Airborne transmission of influenza viruses; Evolution of pandemic influenza viruses; Highly pathogenic avian influenza; Development of live-attenuated influenza vaccine platforms; High containment BSL3+ research

Moriah Szpara

Associate Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and Biology
How genetic variation influences the outcomes of viral infection, particularly for neurotropic viruses such as herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2, using high-throughput sequencing, comparative genomics, neuronal cultures, and genetic manipulation of both host and pathogen.

Anne Vardo-Zalik

Assistant Professor of Biology
The ecology and population genetics of malaria parasites and their vectors

Howie Weiss

Professor of Biology
I am a Biomathematican and very recently moved to Penn State from Georgia Tech (I also had appointments at Emory in Public Health and PBEE). Bacteria and their viruses (phages) provide a way to study ecological and evolutionary processes in real time under the well-controlled laboratory conditions. Many of the questions that our group studies lie at the intersection of fundamental science and improving human and animal health. We develop new approaches to mathematical modeling to better understand the role of the physical structure in how bacteria grow and evolve. To complement this computational work, we work closely with microbiologists, biochemists, virologists, physicians, veterinarians, etc. and combine mathematical models with experiments. In recent years I have taught courses in virus dynamics, population genetics, dynamics and bifurcations, advanced linear algebra, and stochastic processes.