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Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility

Creating super high-definition 3D images of atoms and molecules

Dear users,

We hope you have been staying safe during COVID-19 pandemic. To enhance the safety of users and operators, we have established a remote viewing system.We will send a zoom link before each screening session, and then you will be able to view the microscope monitor from your computer in real-time. In that way, you don't have to be present in the Krios or Arctica room during the screening.

If you have any questions, please let us know.

A joint venture between the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences and the Materials Research Institute, the Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility houses a one-of-a-kind FEI Titan Krios microscope that offers uncompromised data collection for the life sciences while incorporating materials science applications. Specifically, the facility allows for fully-automated atomic-resolution single-particle and high-contrast tomography tilt-series data collection. Additional microscopy components permit a full range of materials science applications, including EELS, STEM, and DPC. 

News

Researchers film human viruses in liquid droplets at near-atomic detail

A research team led by Deb Kelly, Huck Chair in Molecular Biophysics and professor of biomedical engineering at Penn State, has used advanced electron microscopy (EM) technology to see how human viruses move in high resolution in a near-native environment. The visualization technique could lead to improved understanding of how vaccine candidates and treatments behave and function as they interact with target cells, Kelly said.

Novel method of imaging silicon anode degradation may lead to better batteries

A novel method of characterizing the structural and chemical evolution of silicon and a thin layer that governs battery stability may help resolve issues that prevent using silicon for high-capacity batteries, according to a group of researchers.

New images of canine parvovirus may help predict how virus jumps to new species

​Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a highly infectious pathogen that causes severe diseases in unvaccinated dogs, including inflammation of the heart and acute gastrointestinal illness. Originating in cats, the virus is a rare example of a DNA-based virus that can jump between species, and a team of researchers’ discovery may help in predicting this and the virus’ ability to evolve, which could have implications for current vaccines used in dogs.

Antibody binding-site conserved across COVID-19 virus variants

A tiny protein of SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that gives rise to COVID-19, may have big implications for future treatments, according to a team of Penn State researchers.