31 People Results for the Tag: Cell Count

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Qunhua Li

Associate Professor of Statistics
Developing statistical and computational methods for analyzing complex omics data and improving quality and reproducibility of high-throughout data

Richard Mailman

Professor and College of Medicine Distinguished Senior Scholar

Monica Medina

Professor of Biology

Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics

Andrew Deans

Professor of Entomology, Director of the Frost Entomological Museum

Howard Salis

Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering; Associate Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Engineering microorganisms for applications in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering.

Joy Pate

Director of the Center for Reproductive Biology and Health; Professor of Reproductive Physiology; C. Lee Rumberger and Family Chair in Agricultural Sciences
Specializing in the area of ovarian function. Primary research interests focus on the interactions between steroidogenic and immune cells, and the role of microRNA in development and maintenance of the corpus luteum.

Pamela Giblin

Professor of Immunology
The role of receptor tyrosine kinases in normal physiology and disease progression; the downstream signals that mediate these responses in vivo and in vitro.

Shaun Mahony

Assistant Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Computational biology and regulatory genomics

Sujit Pujhari

Assistant Research Professor

Zhi-Chun Lai

Emphasis Area Representative, Cell and Developmental Biology; Professor of Biology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Signal Transduction, Growth Control, and Cancer Genetics

Gary Clawson

Professor of Pathology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Kathleen Brown

Professor of Plant Stress Biology
Regulation of root development. Root responses to edaphic stress. Identification and genetic mapping of traits for adaptation to edaphic stress.

Jonathan Lynch

Distinguished Professor of Plant Nutrition
Plant adaptation to nutrient and water stress. Global change. World hunger. Root biology.

Seogchan Kang

Professor of Plant Pathology & Environmental Microbiology
Genetic and cellular mechanisms underpinning plant-fungal interactions with Arabidopsis thaliana and Fusarium oxysporum as a model system. Molecular genetics and comparative genomics of fungal plant pathogens. Bioinformatics.

Colin Barnstable

Professor and Chair of Neural Behavioral Sciences
How interacting networks of transcription factors and signal transduction molecules guide the development of precursor/stem cells into mature neurons. Role of these networks in neurodegenerative diseases. Factors that can act as neuroprotective agents.

Todd Lajeunesse

Professor of Biology
Microbial Ecology and Evolution

Tomas Carlo-Joglar

Associate Professor of Biology

Jin-Ming Yang

Professor of Pharmacology

Gregory Yochum

Assoc. Professor, Biochemistry

Gustavo Nader

Associate Professor of Kinesiology
Skeletal muscle growth control and adaptations to exercise. Ribosome biogenesis, transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of RNA Polymerase I.

Yifei Huang

Assistant Professor of Biology
Developing novel bioinformatic methods and using them to address fundamental questions in evolutionary genomics and medical genomics.

Gretchen Kuldau

Associate Professor of Plant Pathology

Erika Ganda

Assistant Professor of Food Animal Microbiomes
Developing practical ways to leverage the microbiome to improve food safety and improve food production animals' production efficiency.

Emily Weinert

Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
The mechanisms by which bacteria sense and respond to the environment, as well as how these signaling proteins/pathways affect competition, host colonization, and pathogenesis.

Howie Weiss

Professor of Biology
I am a Biomathematican and very recently moved to Penn State from Georgia Tech (I also had appointments at Emory in Public Health and PBEE). Bacteria and their viruses (phages) provide a way to study ecological and evolutionary processes in real time under the well-controlled laboratory conditions. Many of the questions that our group studies lie at the intersection of fundamental science and improving human and animal health. We develop new approaches to mathematical modeling to better understand the role of the physical structure in how bacteria grow and evolve. To complement this computational work, we work closely with microbiologists, biochemists, virologists, physicians, veterinarians, etc. and combine mathematical models with experiments. In recent years I have taught courses in virus dynamics, population genetics, dynamics and bifurcations, advanced linear algebra, and stochastic processes.

Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics

Ibrahim Ozbolat

Hartz Family Associate Professor of Engineering Science and Mechanics