News

Kateryna Makova IMAGE: PENN STATE

Makova selected as holder of the Verne M. Willaman Chair in the Life Sciences

Kateryna Makova, Pentz Professor of Biology at Penn State, has been appointed as holder of the Verne M. Willaman Chair in the Life Sciences. The appointment, effective on Sept. 1, was made by the Office of the President of the University, based on the recommendation of the dean, in recognition of Makova’s national and international reputation for excellence in research and teaching.

Evolution of the Y chromosome in great apes deciphered

New analysis of the DNA sequence of the male-specific Y chromosomes from all living species of the great ape family helps to clarify our understanding of how this enigmatic chromosome evolved.

Huck Institutes Seeks Director of Graduate Training Initiatives

The Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences is searching for a Penn State faculty member interested in overseeing a number of training programs for master's and doctoral students.

Liana Burghardt awarded Tansley Medal for excellence in plant science

Assistant Professor of Plant Science recognized for outstanding research contributions early in her career.

Researchers identify evolutionary origins of SARS-CoV-2

By reconstructing the evolutionary history of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, an international research team of Chinese, European and U.S. scientists has discovered that the lineage that gave rise to the virus has been circulating in bats for decades and likely includes other viruses with the ability to infect humans.

Researchers offer solution for one of synthetic biology's biggest problems

A team of Penn State and University of Washington researchers recently developed a new algorithm to help prevent the failure of engineered genetic systems, or organisms engineered to have new capabilities.

What determines a warbler's colors?

A new study has narrowed down the region of the genome that drives the black color in throat and face of warblers by studying the hybrid offspring produced when two species mate.

Genes affecting brains and brawn?

Genes located in "copy number variants" (CNVs) — parts of chromosomes that are missing in some individuals and duplicated in others — that are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders affect more than just brain development, according to new research..

BG student receives award for research on immunologic, rheumatologic diseases

Bioinformatics and Genomics student Chachrit Khunsriraksakul has been selected as the recipient of the 2020 Finkelstein Memorial Student Research Award.

Plants pass on 'memory' of stress to some progeny, making them more resilient

By manipulating the expression of one gene, geneticists can induce a form of “stress memory” in plants that is inherited by some progeny, giving them the potential for more vigorous, hardy and productive growth, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest the discovery has significant implications for plant breeding.