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Center for Brain, Behavior, and Cognition

Promoting interdisciplinary and integrative research across the life, social, neural, and computational sciences. 

The Center for Brain, Behavior, and Cognition (CBBC) promotes cutting-edge research that quantifies and addresses the mechanisms underlying human and animal behaviors in complex, natural environments. Members of the CBBC investigate these mechanisms across a wide range of systems at different levels (e.g., molecular, cellular, and physiological) by using different methodological and analytical approaches (e.g., behavioral, imaging, and computational).

News

Researchers publish how-to guide for monitoring and analyzing brain activity

Penn State researchers have developed a set of tools and methods to better monitor and analyze sleep-related signals and fidgeting in rodent brain studies. Considered the bedrock of biomedical research, rodent studies often provide the first advanced understanding of brain activity and are the foundation on which human studies are eventually built.

Robert Sainburg named Huck Chair in Kinesiology and Neurology

Robert “Bob” Sainburg, professor of kinesiology and of neurology and director of the Huck Institutes’ Center for Movement Science and Technology, has been named Huck Distinguished Chair in Kinesiology and Neurology.

David Hughes named Chair in Global Food Security

David Hughes, professor of entomology and biology in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences and creator of PlantVillage, a knowledge platform that helps farmers combat pests and adapt to climate change, has been named the Dorothy Foehr Huck and J. Lloyd Huck Chair in Global Food Security in the University’s Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences.

Coupled brain activity, cerebrospinal fluid flow could indicate Alzheimer's risk

Penn State researchers may have discovered a potential marker to clinically evaluate patients’ risk for Alzheimer’s disease through non-invasive imaging tests, according to a study published in PLOS Biology. The finding may have implications for diagnosis and treatment of the disease that results in significant cognitive decline, the researchers said.