34 People Results for the Tag: Mutagenesis

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Susan Hafenstein

Director of the Center for Structural Biology; Huck Chair of Structural Virology; Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Using a structural approach to learn more about viral infectivity, tropism, evolution and pathogenicity. Developing approaches to visualize critical events that cause a break from the regular symmetry of the virus, including packaging of the genome, receptor usage, antibody interactions and uncoating of the viral genome during the final stages of infection.

Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics

Joyce Jose

Assistant Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Virus-host interactions involved in the pathogenesis of alphaviruses and flaviviruses. Analysis of virus induced structures and cytoskeletal modifications in mammalian host and insect vector using high-resolution live cell imaging and electron microscopy. Viral determinants of neurotropism, encephalitis, transmission and persistence in BSL-3 pathogens.

Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics

Anthony Schmitt

Professor of Molecular Immunology and Infectious Diseases
The process of paramyxovirus particle formation by budding: identifying and characterizing viral proteins used in budding, and learning how these manipulate host budding machinery to allow virus release.

Cooduvalli Shashikant

Former Chair, Intercollege Graduate Degree Program in Bioinformatics and Genomics
Developmental and evolutionary aspects of regulation of patterning genes.

Ira Ropson

Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Folding, stability and function of proteins.

Francesca Chiaromonte

Director of the Genome Sciences Institute; Huck Chair in Statistics for the Life Sciences; Professor of Statistics
Developing methods for the analysis of large, high-dimensional and complex data.

Francisco Diaz

Associate Professor of Reproductive Biology
Ovarian physiology. Role of SMAD-mediated signaling in follicular and female germ cell (oocyte) development.

Kateryna Makova

Director of the Center for Medical Genomics; Professor of Biology
Molecular evolution, population genetics, evolutionary genomics, bioinformatics, and human genetics.

Richard Cyr

Professor Emeritus of Biology

Teh-hui Kao

Chair, Intercollege Graduate Degree Program in Plant Biology; Distinguished Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Molecular, biochemical, and structural bases of the S-RNase-based self-incompatibility system in flowering plants. F-box protein-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of proteins.

B. Tracy Nixon

Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Structural and functional basis of cellulose synthesis. Using Physcomitrella patens and other organisms as model systems, we are learning how plants make cellulose for building new cell wall. The studies use methods of molecular biology and cryoEM to characterize the enzyme as a monomer, and when it assembles into its larger 'Cellulose Synthase Complex '(CSC for short). The aim is to understand cellulose synthesis to explain fundamentals of cell wall biology in plants, and to enable manipulation of its synthesis for applications in fields of bioenergy and materials.

Kristin Eckert

Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Mechanisms of human cell mutagenesis and repetitive DNA replication in relation to genome evolution.

Pamela Mitchell

Emeritus Associate Professor of Biology

Sergei Grigoryev

Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Rebecca Craven

Professor of Microbiology & Immunology

Thomas Spratt

Associate Professor or Biochemistry

Karam El-Bayoumy

Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Shantu Amin

Professor of Pharmacology

John Richie, Jr.

Professor of Health Evaluation Sciences

John Wills

Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Tim Miyashiro

Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
How bacteria adapt to a host environment. The mutualistic symbiosis established between the Hawaiian bobtail squid (Euprymna scolopes) and a bioluminescent bacterium (Vibrio fischeri).

Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics

Tatiana Laremore

Director, Proteomics and Mass Spectrometry Core Facility

Neela Yennawar

Director, X-Ray Crystallography and Automated Biological Calorimetry Core Facilities; Research Professor
Biological calorimetry, protein characterization, molecular modeling, X-ray crystallography, and small-angle X-ray scattering.

Yifei Huang

Assistant Professor of Biology
Developing novel bioinformatic methods and using them to address fundamental questions in evolutionary genomics and medical genomics.

Timothy Meredith

Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Understanding how bacterial cell surface complex lipids are synthesized, to characterize structural modifications in response to varying growth environments, and to uncover how these changes are regulated.

Jean-Paul Armache

Assistant Professor of of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
The mechanisms and functions of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes and their place in gene regulation.

Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics

Emily Weinert

Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
The mechanisms by which bacteria sense and respond to the environment, as well as how these signaling proteins/pathways affect competition, host colonization, and pathogenesis.

Sung Hyun Cho

Assistant Research Professor, Cryo-Electron Microscopy Core Facility

Ruairidh Sawers

Assistant Professor of Plant Response to Abiotic Stress
Local adaptation and stress tolerance in crop plants and their wild relatives; plant nutrition; arbuscular mycorrhizae; maize genetics and genomics.

Denise Okafor

Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Structural mechanisms of signaling and regulation in protein complexes.

Amie Boal

Professor of Chemistry and of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
The structural differences between members of large metalloenzyme superfamilies that share common features but promote different reactions or use distinct cofactors.