22 People Results for the Tag: Molecular Dynamics Simulation

All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Kathleen Postle

Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Signal transduction and iron transport in bacteria

Dajiang Liu

Co-Chair, Intercollege Graduate Degree Program in Bioinformatics and Genomics; Professor of Public Health Sciences and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Developing novel methods to analyze very large scale datasets in order to identify genes that are responsible for disease, understand the disease mechanism, and gain clinical insights.

Hyunwook Lee

Postdoctoral Scholar - Hafenstein Lab

Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics

Kurt Vandegrift

Associate Professor
Disease ecology with an emphasis on the population dynamics of zoonotic parasites and reservoir hosts.

Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics

Joanna Floros

Evan Pugh Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology,OB/GYN

Sally Assmann

Waller Professor of Biology
Molecular biology of plant G-proteins and kinases. Phytohormone regulation of signal transduction and RNA processing. Second messenger regulation of ion channels in plant cells.

Daniel Cosgrove

Eberly Chair and Professor of Biology
Mechanism of plant growth. Function and evolution of expansins. Biochemistry and rheology of plant cell walls. Growth responses to light, hormones, and water stress and other stimuli.

B. Tracy Nixon

Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Structural and functional basis of cellulose synthesis. Using Physcomitrella patens and other organisms as model systems, we are learning how plants make cellulose for building new cell wall. The studies use methods of molecular biology and cryoEM to characterize the enzyme as a monomer, and when it assembles into its larger 'Cellulose Synthase Complex '(CSC for short). The aim is to understand cellulose synthesis to explain fundamentals of cell wall biology in plants, and to enable manipulation of its synthesis for applications in fields of bioenergy and materials.

J. Martin Bollinger

Professor of Chemistry; Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Mechanisms of metalloenzymes and metallofactor assembly

John Golbeck

Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics
Light reactions in photosynthesis. Structure and function of photosystem I and the heliobacterial reaction center. Regulation and bioassembly of iron-sulfur clusters in cyanobacteria and plants. Plant and bacterial metalloproteins. Generation using Photosystem I, hydrogenase, and molecular wire technology.

Rebecca Craven

Professor of Microbiology & Immunology

Edward O’Brien

Professor of Chemistry
Developing and applying Physical Bioinformatic techniques to measure rates of translation transcriptome-wide and their molecular origins as relates to fundamental biology and disease.

Nikolay Dokholyan

G. Thomas Passananti Professor of Pharmacology; Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
We are a translational systems research group in the Pharmacology at the Penn State College of Medicine. Our laboratory focuses on understanding etiologies of human diseases, such as cystic fibrosis (CF), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and pain conditions, such as hyperalgesia.

Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics

Deb Kelly

Director of the Center for Structural Oncology; Huck Chair in Molecular Biophysics; Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Engineering new molecular paradigms to create a world without cancer.

Will Dearnaley

Technical Director, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering & Center for Structural Oncology

Denise Okafor

Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Structural mechanisms of signaling and regulation in protein complexes.

Enrique Gomez

Professor of Chemical Engineering

Ganesh Srinivasan Anand

Associate Professor of Chemistry
Dynamics of large biomolecular complexes; uncovering what drives their assembly, regulation and function through mass spectrometry.

Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics

Ruobo Zhou

Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Quantitatively and functionally understanding the compartmentalization and spatiotemporal organization of protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions involved in fundamental cell functions as well as in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

Amie Boal

Professor of Chemistry and of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
The structural differences between members of large metalloenzyme superfamilies that share common features but promote different reactions or use distinct cofactors.