23 People Results for the Tag: Extremities

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Aimin Liu

Associate Professor of Biology
Biogenesis and function of cilia in mammalian embryonic development.

Robert Sainburg

Director of the Center for Movement Science and Technology; Huck Distinguished Chair in Kinesiology and Neurology; Professor of Kinesiology and of Neurology
The neural mechanisms that underlie control, coordination, and learning of voluntary movements in humans. Functional neuroanatomy of lateralized processes of motor control. Neurorehabilitation and Functional Recovery in stroke patients.

Daniel Weiss

Associate Professor of Psychology
The cognitive mechanisms underlying language acquisition

Francisco Diaz

Associate Professor of Reproductive Biology
Ovarian physiology. Role of SMAD-mediated signaling in follicular and female germ cell (oocyte) development.

Zhi-Chun Lai

Emphasis Area Representative, Cell and Developmental Biology; Professor of Biology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Signal Transduction, Growth Control, and Cancer Genetics

David Proctor

Professor of Kinesiology, Physiology, and Medicine
Physiology of aging and exercise; cardiovascular responses to exercise; regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow; skeletal muscle adaptation; vascular adaptation.

Lacy Alexander

Professor of Kinesiology
Dr. Alexander utilizes in vivo and in vitro approaches using the human cutaneous circulation to examine the underlying signaling mechanisms mediating microvascular dysfunction with primary human aging, hypercholesterolemia, and essential hypertension.

Jonas Rubenson

Associate Professor of Kinesiology
Integrating experimental and modeling approaches to study gait and skeletal muscle function during locomotion in both health and disease/impairment. In particular, the relationship between in vivo muscle mechanics and metabolic energetics and mechanisms underlying locomotor adaptation and optimization.

Peter Wilf

Professor of Geosciences

Amir Sheikhi

Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering
Micro- and nanoengineered soft materials for medicine and the environment; microfluidic-enabled biomaterials for tissue engineering and regeneration; living materials; next-generation bioadhesives, tissue sealants, and hemostatic agents; hydrogels for minimally invasive medical technologies; self-healing and adaptable soft materials; smart coatings; hairy nanocelluloses as an emerging family of advanced materials.

Natalie Boyle

Assistant Research Professor; Insect Biodiversity Center Program Coordinator

Tarkeshwar Singh

Assistant Professor of Kinesiology

Joseph Cusumano

Professor of Engineering Science and Mechanics