16 People Results for the Tag: Dna Replication

All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Mark Hedglin

Assistant Professor of Chemistry; Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Deciphering how efficient and faithful replication of the human genome is achieved within the highly-complex, dynamic, and reactive environment of the nucleus. Identifying pathways for genomic instability in humans, identifying novel oncogenic drug targets, developing better chemotherapeutic treatments for human cancers caused by genomic instability.

Tae-Hee Lee

Professor of Chemistry
Single-molecule biophysics of the nucleosome and chromatin

Yingwei Mao

Associate Professor of Biology
Regulation of neurogenesis using cellular and mouse models; analysis of abnormal neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation and its relationship to mental illnesses; identification of drugs that can reverse mouse models of psychiatric disorders.

Elizabeth McGraw

Professor and Huck Scholar in Entomology
The genetics of vector, pathogen and symbiont interactions.

Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics

Lu Bai

Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Associate Professor of Physics
Single cell / single molecule study of chromatin and gene regulation.

Shaun Mahony

Associate Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
We apply neural networks and other machine learning approaches to understand how transcription factors control cellular identity

Kristin Eckert

Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Mechanisms of human cell mutagenesis and repetitive DNA replication in relation to genome evolution.

Richard Frisque

Professor of Molecular Virology

Neil Christensen

Professor of Pathology and Microbiology and Immunology

Ralph Keil

Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Thomas Spratt

Associate Professor or Biochemistry

Emily Weinert

Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
The mechanisms by which bacteria sense and respond to the environment, as well as how these signaling proteins/pathways affect competition, host colonization, and pathogenesis.

Stephen Benkovic

Evan Pugh University Professor and Eberly Chair in Chemistry

Xiang Zhu

Assistant Professor of Statistics
Statistical Genetics and Genomics