15 People Results for the Tag: Crystalline Materials

All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Benjamin Allen

Assistant Research Professor
Computational approaches to protein engineering; Using protein structure to guide bioinformatics for projects including identification of malaria vaccine targets

Melik Demirel

Huck Chair in Biomimetic Materials; Pearce Professor of Engineering
Prof. Dr. Melik Demirel holds a tenured professor position in engineering at Penn State, and has a decade of experience in biosensors and nanomaterials. Prof. Demirel’s achievements have been recognized, in part, through his receipt of a Young Investigator Award, an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship, an Institute for Complex Adaptive Matter Junior Fellowship, the Pearce Development Professorship at Penn State, a Boeing Distinguished Speaker Award. Prof. Demirel received his Ph.D. from Carnegine Mellon University and B.S. and M.S. degrees from Bogazici University.

Clive Randall

Advisor for the Center for Mathematics of Living and Mimetic Matter

Long-Qing Chen

Advisor for the Center for Mathematics of Living and Mimetic Matter

Daniel Cosgrove

Eberly Chair and Professor of Biology
Mechanism of plant growth. Function and evolution of expansins. Biochemistry and rheology of plant cell walls. Growth responses to light, hormones, and water stress and other stimuli.

Teh-hui Kao

Chair, Intercollege Graduate Degree Program in Plant Biology; Distinguished Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Molecular, biochemical, and structural bases of the S-RNase-based self-incompatibility system in flowering plants. F-box protein-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of proteins.

B. Tracy Nixon

Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Structural and functional basis of cellulose synthesis. Using Physcomitrella patens and other organisms as model systems, we are learning how plants make cellulose for building new cell wall. The studies use methods of molecular biology and cryoEM to characterize the enzyme as a monomer, and when it assembles into its larger 'Cellulose Synthase Complex '(CSC for short). The aim is to understand cellulose synthesis to explain fundamentals of cell wall biology in plants, and to enable manipulation of its synthesis for applications in fields of bioenergy and materials.

Donald Bryant

Ernest C. Pollard Professor of Biotechnology; Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Photosynthesis, structure-function relationships of proteins, gene regulation, and microbial physiology. Cyanobacteria and green sulfur bacteria. Genomics of photosynthetic bacteria.

John Golbeck

Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics
Light reactions in photosynthesis. Structure and function of photosystem I and the heliobacterial reaction center. Regulation and bioassembly of iron-sulfur clusters in cyanobacteria and plants. Plant and bacterial metalloproteins. Generation using Photosystem I, hydrogenase, and molecular wire technology.

Ming Tien

Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Characterization and biochemical analysis of cellulose synthesis in a variety of organisms. Mechanism and regulation of fungal degradation of lignin. Dissimilatory Iron reduction.

Jeffrey Catchmark

Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Cellulose synthesis and organization, cellulosic composites and coatings, microbial cellulose production, and chemically powered microfluidic and biological devices and sensors.

Ying Gu

Associate Professor, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Mechanism of cellulose biosynthesis in higher plants. Genetic modification of plant cell wall to scale-up biofuel production.

Xin Zhang

Assistant Professor of Chemistry; Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Paul Berg Early Career Professorship in the Eberly College of Science
Developing chemical tools to monitor cellular stresses that influence protein folding in real time. Deciphering how the energy landscapes associated with proper protein folding and function are regulated by the cellular folding environment. Examining how this regulation leads to significant biological consequences.

Daniel Hayes

Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Bbiomaterials engineering for applications ranging from regenerative medicine to lab-on-a-chip technologies. An emphasis on nanomaterials, macromolecules and composite structures. Ongoing efforts include development of optically and magnetically modulated drug delivery systems, quasi 3D cell sheet culture systems, cell encapsulation and delivery materials and hybrid in situ polymerizing grafts/augments.