Sarah Craig

Assistant Research Professor

Sarah Craig

Huck Affiliations

Links

Publication Tags

Proteins Growth Gastrointestinal Microbiome Genes Hominidae Mating Systems Reproductive Strategy Protein Sperm Competition Mating Behavior Gene Rate Microbiota Transcriptome Weight Gain Rna Body Weight Trajectory Child Tissue Tissues Spermatozoa Semen Weights And Measures Diet Primates

Most Recent Papers

Associations between stool micro-transcriptome, gut microbiota, and infant growth.

M Carney, X Zhan, A Rangnekar, M Chroneos, Craig SJC, Kateryna Makova, I Paul, S Hicks, 2021, Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease on p. 1-7

Child Weight Gain Trajectories Linked To Oral Microbiota Composition

Sarah Craig, Daniel Blankenberg, Alice Carla Luisa Parodi, Ian Paul, Leann L. Birch, Jennifer Savage Williams, Michele E. Marini, Jennifer L. Stokes, Anton Nekrutenko, Matthew Logan Reimherr, Francesca Chiaromonte, Kateryna Dmytrivna Makova, 2018, Scientific Reports

Rates of evolution of hominoid seminal proteins are correlated with function and expression, rather than mating system

S. J. Carnahan-Craig, M. I. Jensen-Seaman, 2014, Journal of Molecular Evolution on p. 87-99

Hominoid seminal protein evolution and ancestral mating behavior

Sarah J. Carnahan, Michael I. Jensen-Seaman, 2008, American Journal of Primatology on p. 939-948

Most-Cited Papers

Child Weight Gain Trajectories Linked To Oral Microbiota Composition

Sarah Craig, Daniel Blankenberg, Alice Carla Luisa Parodi, Ian Paul, Leann L. Birch, Jennifer Savage Williams, Michele E. Marini, Jennifer L. Stokes, Anton Nekrutenko, Matthew Logan Reimherr, Francesca Chiaromonte, Kateryna Dmytrivna Makova, 2018, Scientific Reports

Rates of evolution of hominoid seminal proteins are correlated with function and expression, rather than mating system

S. J. Carnahan-Craig, M. I. Jensen-Seaman, 2014, Journal of Molecular Evolution on p. 87-99

Associations between stool micro-transcriptome, gut microbiota, and infant growth.

M Carney, X Zhan, A Rangnekar, M Chroneos, Craig SJC, Kateryna Makova, I Paul, S Hicks, 2021, Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease on p. 1-7

News Articles Featuring Sarah Craig

Mouth bacteria in toddlers may predict obesity, study says

Bacteria in a toddler's mouth might help predict later obesity, new research suggests. Scientists at Penn State University found the composition of microorganisms in the mouths of 2-year-olds offers clues to the child's future weight.

Swabbing a child’s mouth for bacteria could predict how likely they are to become obese

A swab of a toddler’s mouth may predict their odds of growing into obese children, a new study suggests. Scientists at Pennsylvania State University discovered that the harmless microorganisms living in a two-year-old’s mouth were less diverse if they had gained more weight more quickly than most since birth.

Your Child's Mouth Could Reveal Their Obesity Risk

Scientists believe the bacteria that live in a toddler’s mouth could provide clues as to whether they will become obese. Existing research suggests the microbes inhabiting the guts and mouths of obese adults differ to those without the condition, but less is known about this pattern in children. So biologists at Pennsylvania State University set out to investigate what a child’s microbiota could say about their weight.

Child Weight Gain Trajectories Linked To Oral Microbiota Composition

Gut and oral microbiota perturbations have been observed in obese adults and adolescents; less is known about their influence on weight gain in young children.