Marilyn Roossinck

Professor of Plant Pathology and Biology

Marilyn Roossinck

Research Summary

Virus-plant interactions, virus evolution and ecology and evolution of disease

Huck Affiliations

Links

Publication Tags

Viruses Plant Viruses Fungi Rna Viruses Bacteria Biodiversity Symbiosis Metagenomics Ecology Cucumber Mosaic Virus Cucumovirus Genome Rna Capsicum Phylogeny Zea Mays Rna Replicase Proteins Virus Replication Bell Pepper Endornavirus Databases Aphidoidea Ecosystem Alveolata Symbionts

Most Recent Papers

Evolution of mycoviruses. Reference Module in Life Sciences

Mahtab Peyambari, Vaskar Thapa, Marilyn Roossinck,

Phylogeographic analysis of Pseudogymnoascus destructans partitivirus-pa explains the spread dynamics of white-nose syndrome in North America

Vaskar Thapa, Gregory Turner, Marilyn Roossinck, 2021, PLOS Pathogens

Preface

John P. Carr, Marilyn J. Roossinck, 2020, Advances in Virus Research on p. xi-xii

Viruses in the phytobiome

Marilyn J. Roossinck, 2019, Current Opinion in Virology on p. 72-76

Manipulation of aphid behavior by a persistent plant virus

Maliheh Safari, Matthew J. Ferrari, Marilyn J. Roossinck, 2019, Journal of Virology on p. e01781--18

A 1,000-year-old RNA virus

Mahtab Peyambari, Sylvia Warner, Nicholas Stoler, Drew Rainer, Marilyn J. Roossinck, 2019, Journal of Virology

Evolutionary and ecological links between plant and fungal viruses

Marilyn J. Roossinck, 2019, New Phytologist on p. 86-92

Evolutionary and ecological links between plant and fungal viruses

Marilyn Roossinck, 2019, New Phytologist

Impact of cultivated hosts on the recombination of cucumber mosaic virus

Rimnoma S. Ouedraogo, Justin S. Pita, Irenée P. Somda, Oumar Traore, Marilyn J. Roossinck, 2019, Journal of Virology

Determinants of coinfection in the mycoviruses

Vaskar Thapa, Marilyn J. Roossinck, 2019, Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology

Most-Cited Papers

The good viruses

Marilyn J. Roossinck, 2011, Nature Reviews Microbiology on p. 99-108

Consensus statement

Peter Simmonds, Mike J. Adams, Mária Benk, Mya Breitbart, J. Rodney Brister, Eric B. Carstens, Andrew J. Davison, Eric Delwart, Alexander E. Gorbalenya, Balázs Harrach, Roger Hull, Andrew M.Q. King, Eugene V. Koonin, Mart Krupovic, Jens H. Kuhn, Elliot J. Lefkowitz, Max L. Nibert, Richard Orton, Marilyn J. Roossinck, Sead Sabanadzovic, Matthew B. Sullivan, Curtis A. Suttle, Robert B. Tesh, René A. Van Der Vlugt, Arvind Varsani, F. Murilo Zerbini, 2017, Nature Reviews Microbiology on p. 161-168

Plant virus metagenomics

Marilyn J. Roossinck, Darren P. Martin, Philippe Roumagnac, 2015, Phytopathology on p. 716-727

Plant virus metagenomics

Marilyn J. Roossinck, 2012, Annual Review of Genetics on p. 359-369

Plants, viruses and the environment

Marilyn J. Roossinck, 2015, Virology on p. 271-277

The remarkable evolutionary history of endornaviruses

Marilyn J. Roossinck, Sead Sabanadzovic, Ryo Okada, Rodrigo A. Valverde, 2011, Journal of General Virology on p. 2674-2678

Ecosystem simplification, biodiversity loss and plant virus emergence

Marilyn J. Roossinck, Fernando García-Arenal, 2015, Current Opinion in Virology on p. 56-62

Move over, bacteria! viruses make their mark as mutualistic microbial symbionts

Marilyn J. Roossinck, 2015, Journal of Virology on p. 6532-6535

Bell pepper endornavirus

Ryo Okada, Eri Kiyota, Sead Sabanadzovic, Hiromitsu Moriyama, Toshiyuki Fukuhara, Prasenjit Saha, Marilyn J. Roossinck, Ake Severin, Rodrigo A. Valverde, 2011, Journal of General Virology on p. 2664-2673

ICTV virus taxonomy profile

Eeva J. Vainio, Sotaro Chiba, Said A. Ghabrial, Edgar Maiss, Marilyn Roossinck, Sead Sabanadzovic, Nobuhiro Suzuki, Jiatao Xie, Max Nibert, 2018, Journal of General Virology on p. 17-18

News Articles Featuring Marilyn Roossinck

How virus detectives trace the origins of an outbreak – and why it’s so tricky

In order to predict and prevent future pandemics like COVID-19, researchers need to find the origin of the viruses that cause them. This is not a trivial task. The origin of HIV was not clear until 20 years after it spread around the world. Scientists still don’t know the origin of Ebola, even though it has caused periodic epidemics since the 1970s.

Virus Diversity Dependent on Host: Marilyn Roossinck Discusses Her Research

Professor and virologist Marilyn Roossinck appeared on the Finding Genius Podcast to talk about her research and how her work on persistent plant viruses has changed how she conceives of the larger virus community.

The mysterious disappearance of the first SARS virus, and why we need a vaccine for the current one but didn’t for the other

Some people question why the current coronavirus has brought the world to standstill while a previous deadly coronavirus, SARS, did not.

The mysterious disappearance of the first SARS virus, and why we need a vaccine for the current one but didn't for the other

Some people question why the current coronavirus has brought the world to standstill while a previous deadly coronavirus, SARS, did not.

What are viruses anyway, and why do they make us so sick? 5 questions answered

You may sometimes have felt like you "have come down with a virus," meaning that you became sick from being exposed to something that could have been a virus. In fact, you have a virus - actually, many - all the time. Some viruses cause the common cold, and some are crucial to human survival. New viruses can also emerge, and they typically create illness in humans when they have very recently jumped from another species to humans. As world health leaders try to determine how to respond to the new coronavirus, virus expert Marilyn J. Roossinck answers a few questions.

What are viruses anyway, and why do they make us so sick? 5 questions answered

You may sometimes have felt like you “have come down with a virus,” meaning that you became sick from being exposed to something that could have been a virus. In fact, you have a virus – actually, many – all the time.

What are viruses anyway, and why do they make us so sick? 5 questions answered

You may sometimes have felt like you “have come down with a virus,” meaning that you became sick from being exposed to something that could have been a virus. In fact, you have a virus – actually, many – all the time. Some viruses cause the common cold, and some are crucial to human survival. New viruses can also emerge, and they typically create illness in humans when they have very recently jumped from another species to humans.

Setting the Record Straight: Panic and Pandemics

First reported in Wuhan, China, on December 31, the respiratory illness prompted by coronavirus (dubbed COVID-19) has since spread to 28 countries worldwide, infecting more than 60,000 individuals. Unfortunately, as cases across the globe increase, so too does the dangerous misinformation surrounding them. The below titles, about outbreaks, viruses, and vaccines, attempt to set the record straight.

A New Discovery Upends What We Know About Viruses

A plant virus distributes its genes into eight separate segments that can all reproduce, even if they infect different cells.

Grant Supports Research to Combat White-Nose Syndrome in Bats

Penn State research aimed at combating white-nose syndrome in bats has received funding from the Bats for the Future Fund, a public-private partnership between the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Forest Service, Southern Company, and the Avangrid Foundation.