Margherita Cantorna

Director of the Center for Molecular Immunology and Infectious Disease; Distinguished Professor of Molecular Immunology

Margherita Cantorna

Research Summary

Understanding the working of the immune system. Utilizing animal models of several human diseases including enteric infections and inflammatory bowel disease to determine the cellular targets and molecular signals by which dietary components regulate immunity.

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Vitamin D Vitamin A Calcitriol Receptors T Lymphocytes Citrobacter Rodentium Infection Colon Small Intestine Infections Inflammation Homeostasis Microbiota Genes Mice Vitamin A Deficiency Vitamin Vitamin D Deficiency Lymphocytes Gene Expression Knockout Mice Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Cells Interleukin 22 Gastrointestinal Microbiome Interleukin 4

Most Recent Publications

Mark B. Meyer, Carlos Bernal-Mizrachi, Daniel D. Bikle, Madhu Biyani, Moray J. Campbell, Snehal N. Chaudhari, Sylvia Christakos, Sue A. Ingles, Megan M. Knuth, Seong Min Lee, Thomas S. Lisse, Eva S. Liu, Isabelle Piec, Lori A. Plum, Sudhaker D. Rao, Carmen J. Reynolds, Tom D. Thacher, John H. White, Margherita T. Cantorna, 2023, Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Margherita T. Cantorna, Juhi Arora, 2023, Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Vitamin D, microbiota, and inflammatory bowel disease

Margherita T. Cantorna, Juhi Arora, 2023, on p. 1057-1073

Adrian R. Martineau, Margherita T. Cantorna, 2022, Nature Reviews Immunology on p. 529-530

Juhi Arora, Jinpeng Wang, Veronika Weaver, Yongwei Zhang, Margherita T. Cantorna, 2022, Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Micha Davila, Ming Xu, Chengyu Huang, Erin Gaddes, Levi Winter, Margherita Cantorna, Yong Wang, N Xiong, 2022, iScience

Juhi Arora, Devanshi Patel, McKayla Nicol, Cassandra Field, Katherine Restori, Jinpeng Wang, Nicole Froelich, Bhuvana Katkere, Josey Terwilliger, Veronika Weaver, others, Erin Luley, Kathleen Kelly, Girish S. Kirimanjeswara, Troy Sutton, Margherita T. Cantorna, 2022, Nutrients on p. 3061

Zhi Chai, Yafei Lyu, Q Chen, Cheng-Hsin Wei, Lindsay Snyder, I.M. Snyder, Veronika Weaver, Aswathy Sebastian, Albert, Istv\'an, István Albert, Qunhua Li, Margherita Cantorna, A Ross, Catharine Ross, others, 2022, Nutrients on p. 1563

Zhi Chai, Yafei Lyu, Qiuyan Chen, Cheng Hsin Wei, Lindsay M. Snyder, Veronika Weaver, Aswathy Sebastian, István Albert, Qunhua Li, Margherita T. Cantorna, A. Catharine Ross, 2021, Nutrition Reports International

Redefining the targets of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) utilizing a novel VDR reporter mouse.

Juhi Arora, Margherita Cantorna, 2021, The Journal of Immunology on p. 24--10

Most-Cited Papers

Margherita T. Cantorna, Lindsay Snyder, Yang Ding Lin, Linlin Yang, 2015, Nutrients on p. 3011-3021

Margherita T. Cantorna, Lindsay Snyder, Juhi Arora, 2019, Critical Reviews in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology on p. 184-192

Mary Jo Feeney, Johanna Dwyer, Clare M. Hasler-Lewis, John A. Milner, Manny Noakes, Sylvia Rowe, Mark Wach, Robert B. Beelman, Joe Caldwell, Margherita T. Cantorna, Lisa A. Castlebury, Shu Ting Chang, Lawrence J. Cheskin, Roger Clemens, Greg Drescher, Victor L. Fulgoni, David B. Haytowitz, Van S. Hubbard, David Law, Amy Myrdal Miller, Bart Minor, Susan S. Percival, Gabriela Riscuta, Barbara Schneeman, Suzanne Thornsbury, Cheryl D. Toner, Catherine E. Woteki, Dayong Wu, 2014, Journal of Nutrition

Margherita T. Cantorna, Kaitlin McDaniel, Stephanie Bora, Jing Chen, Jamaal James, 2014, Experimental Biology and Medicine on p. 1524-1530

Naveen Kaushal, Avinash K. Kudva, Andrew D. Patterson, Christopher Chiaro, Mary J. Kennett, Dhimant Desai, Shantu Amin, Bradley A. Carlson, Margherita T. Cantorna, K. Sandeep Prabhu, 2014, Journal of Immunology on p. 3683-3692

Jing Chen, Amanda Waddell, Yang-Ding Lin, Margherita Cantorna, 2015, Mucosal Immunology on p. 618--626

The vitamin D receptor turns off chronically activated T cells

Margherita Cantorna, Amanda Waddell, 2014, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences on p. 70--75

Stephanie Bora, M Kennett, Philip B. Smith, Andrew D. Patterson, Margherita Cantorna, 2018, Frontiers in Immunology on p. 315814

Yang-Ding Lin, Juhi Arora, Kevin Diehl, Stephanie Bora, Margherita T. Cantorna, 2019, Frontiers in Immunology on p. 435382

News Articles Featuring Margherita Cantorna

22 Best Vitamin D-Rich Foods for Immunity & Bone Health

Give your health a boost during the winter months with these foods rich in vitamin D

How Vitamin D Can Affect Your Gut Microbiome

Getting daily sunlight is good for your mind — and your microbiome.

7 Things to know before taking Vitamin D Supplements

Known as the "sunshine pill” for its supposed ability to mimic the effects of sunshine on health, vitamin D supplements are a billion-dollar industry. People take vitamin D supplements for a variety of reasons, mental and physical. Some take it if they feel sad, perhaps as the result of the winter blues, for example. Others take it because vitamin D supposedly plays a role in bone health.

Why getting enough vitamin D in wintertime is so important

Winter is upon us and so is the risk of vitamin D deficiency and infections. Vitamin D — which is made in our skin following sunlight exposure and also found in oily fish (mackerel, tuna and sardines), mushrooms and fortified dairy and nondairy substitutes — is essential for good health.

Why you need more Vitamin D in the winter

Winter is upon us and so is the risk of vitamin D deficiency and infections. Vitamin D, which is made in our skin following sunlight exposure and also found in oily fish (mackerel, tuna and sardines), mushrooms and fortified dairy and nondairy substitutes, is essential for good health.

Why you need more Vitamin D in the winter

Winter is upon us and so is the risk of vitamin D deficiency and infections. Vitamin D, which is made in our skin following sunlight exposure and also found in oily fish (mackerel, tuna and sardines), mushrooms and fortified dairy and nondairy substitutes, is essential for good health.

Eating white button mushrooms may improve blood sugar control

A new study has found that eating white button mushrooms can affect glucose, or blood sugar, regulation, thereby reducing diabetes and other metabolic conditions, such as obesity.