Douglas Cavener

Huck Distinguished Chair in Evolutionary Genetics; Professor of Biology; Former Dean, Eberly College of Science

Douglas Cavener

Research Summary

Regulation of protein synthesis and control of translation initiation of mRNAs in higher eukaryotes and the evolution of tissue specific transcriptional regulation.

Huck Graduate Students

Huck Affiliations

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Publication Tags

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Proteins Protein Genes Insulin Endoplasmic Reticulum Unfolded Protein Response Cell Proliferation Protein Kinases Perk Kinase Mammals Giraffa Camelopardalis Protein Synthesis Glucose Homeostasis Mice Insulin Derivative Proinsulin Mutation Phosphorylation Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Regeneration Schwann Cells Cell Cycle Physiology Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells

Most Recent Publications

Derek E. Lee, George G. Lohay, James Madeli, Douglas R. Cavener, Monica L. Bond, 2023, African Journal of Ecology on p. 345-353

George G. Lohay, Derek E. Lee, Lan Wu-Cavener, David L. Pearce, Xiaoyi Hou, Monica L. Bond, Douglas R. Cavener, 2023, Ecology and Evolution

Jingjie Hu, Rebecca A. Bourne, Jingjie Hu, Barbara C. McGrath, D Cavener, Alice Lin, Rebecca Bourne, Zifei Pei, Alice Lin, Z Pei, Douglas R. Cavener, 2021, Molecular Therapy on p. 3274-3292

Mariapaola Sidoli, Chelsey B. Reed, Cristina Scapin, Pablo Paez, Douglas R. Cavener, Randal J. Kaufman, Maurizio D’Antonio, M. Laura Feltri, Lawrence Wrabetz, 2021, Journal of Neuroscience on p. 4536-4548

G Lohay, T Weathers, A Estes, Barbara C. McGrath, Douglas Cavener, 2020, Ecology and Evolution on p. 11069-11089

Hiromi Yamazaki, Shuya Kasai, Junsei Mimura, Peng Ye, Atsushi Inose-Maruyama, Kunikazu Tanji, Koichi Wakabayashi, Seiya Mizuno, Fumihiro Sugiyama, Satoru Takahashi, Tsubasa Sato, Taku Ozaki, Douglas R. Cavener, Masayuki Yamamoto, Ken Itoh, 2020, PLoS Genetics

C Sowers, R Wang, R Bourne, Barbara C. McGrath, J Hu, S Bevilacqua, J Paton, A Paton, S Collardeau-Frachon, M Nicolino, Douglas R. Cavener, 2018, Journal of Biological Chemistry on p. 5134-5149

Guangyan Xiong, Sajedah M. Hindi, Aman K. Mann, Yann S. Gallot, Kyle R. Bohnert, Douglas R. Cavener, Scott R. Whittemore, Ashok Kumar, 2017, eLife

Most-Cited Papers

Xiaoyu Liu, Dongmin Kwak, Zhongbing Lu, Xin Xu, John Fassett, Huan Wang, Yidong Wei, Douglas R. Cavener, Xinli Hu, Jennifer Hall, Robert J. Bache, Yingjie Chen, 2014, Hypertension on p. 738-744

Wenzhong Yang, Xueyan Zhou, Helena R. Zimmermann, Douglas R. Cavener, Eric Klann, Tao Ma, 2016, Neurobiology of Aging on p. 19-24

Mimi A. Trinh, Tao Ma, Hanoch Kaphzan, Aditi Bhattacharya, Marcia D. Antion, Douglas R. Cavener, Charles A. Hoeffer, Eric Klann, 2014, Learning and Memory on p. 298-304

Guangyan Xiong, Sajedah M. Hindi, Aman K. Mann, Yann S. Gallot, Kyle R. Bohnert, Douglas R. Cavener, Scott R. Whittemore, Ashok Kumar, 2017, eLife

Morris Agaba, Edson Ishengoma, Webb C. Miller, Barbara C. McGrath, Chelsea N. Hudson, Oscar C. Bedoya Reina, Aakrosh Ratan, Rico Burhans, Rayan Chikhi, Paul Medvedev, Craig A. Praul, Lan Wu-Cavener, Brendan Wood, Heather Robertson, Linda Penfold, Douglas R. Cavener, 2016, Nature Communications

C Sowers, R Wang, R Bourne, Barbara C. McGrath, J Hu, S Bevilacqua, J Paton, A Paton, S Collardeau-Frachon, M Nicolino, Douglas R. Cavener, 2018, Journal of Biological Chemistry on p. 5134-5149

Mariapaola Sidoli, Nicolò Musner, Nicholas Silvestri, Daniela Ungaro, Maurizio D’Antonio, Douglas R. Cavener, M. Laura Feltri, Lawrence Wrabetz, 2016, Journal of Neuroscience on p. 11350-11361

Rong Wang, Elyse E. Munoz, Siying Zhu, Barbara C. McGrath, Douglas R. Cavener, 2014, PLoS One

Siying Zhu, Keely Henninger, Barbara C. McGrath, Douglas R. Cavener, 2016, PLoS One on p. e0162766

News Articles Featuring Douglas Cavener

Female giraffes drove the evolution of long giraffe necks in order to feed on the most nutritious leaves, new research suggests

Everything in biology ultimately boils down to food and sex. To survive as an individual you need food. To survive as a species you need sex.

Female giraffes drove the evolution of long giraffe necks in order to feed on the most nutritious leaves, new research suggests

Everything in biology ultimately boils down to food and sex. To survive as an individual you need food. To survive as a species you need sex.

Food, not sex, drove the evolution of giraffes’ long neck, new study finds

Why do giraffes have such long necks? A study led by Penn State biologists explores how this trait might have evolved and lends new insight into this iconic question. The reigning hypothesis is that competition among males influenced neck length, but the research team found that female giraffes have proportionally longer necks than males — suggesting that high nutritional needs of females may have driven the evolution of this trait.

Masai giraffes at increased risk after subspecies divides into two

Already endangered Masai giraffes are even more at risk than previously thought.

Giraffes ‘more endangered than previously thought’

Giraffes in East Africa may be more endangered than previously thought, researchers reveal in a study calling for more focused conservation strategies to protect them.

Endangered Masai giraffes may be inbreeding themselves to extinction

Masai giraffes are endangered, and their numbers have almost halved in the last 30 years due to hunting and habitat loss. But these towering animals may be facing a new threat to their future, a recent study reveals — inbreeding.

Masai giraffes more endangered than previously thought

Giraffes in eastern Africa may be even more endangered than previously thought. A new study led by researchers at Penn State revealed that populations of Masai giraffes separated geographically by the Great Rift Valley have not interbred — or exchanged genetic material — in more than a thousand years, and in some cases hundreds of thousands of years.

Metal AF Giraffe Cousins Had Skulls Made for Bashing

Before evolution made giraffes, it made this feisty little gentleman.

Douglas Cavener named Huck Chair in Evolutionary Genetics

Douglas R. Cavener, Penn State professor of biology and former Verne M. Willaman Dean of the Eberly College of Science, has been named Dorothy Foehr Huck and J. Lloyd Huck Distinguished Chair in Evolutionary Genetics by the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences.

Bypassing broken genes

A new approach to gene editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system bypasses disease-causing mutations in a gene, enabling treatment of genetic diseases linked to a single gene, such as cystic fibrosis, certain types of sickle cell anemia, and other rare diseases