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An international research team has identified more than 600 new antimalarial drug candidates from a screen of over 500,000 chemical compounds. Researchers at Penn State then used a method they developed called metabolic fingerprint profiling to determine if 13 of the most potent compounds affect the malaria parasite’s metabolism. The method identifies similar patterns in metabolic response, and revealed that ten of the compounds (red branch) target the same metabolic pathway, the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Credit: Llinás lab, Penn State

Unprecedented screen of 500,000 compounds reveals new candidates for malaria prevention drug

A new study, published December 7, 2018, in the journal Science by an international team of researchers including two from Penn State, reveals a new set of chemical starting points for the first drugs to prevent malaria instead of just treating its symptoms.

Vasant G. Honavar, professor and Edward Frymoyer Chair of Information Sciences and Technology at Penn State, has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Honavar named Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Vasant G. Honavar, professor and Edward Frymoyer Chair of Information Sciences and Technology at Penn State, has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He was elected by the AAAS Section on Information, Computing, and Communication for his distinguished contributions to research and leadership in data science.

Graduate students in the EGR training program’s inaugural group. Credit: Penn State

Training grant supports graduate students studying gene regulation

A new $2.4 million-dollar program to train graduate students in the area of eukaryotic gene regulation (EGR) has been established at Penn State with funding from the National Institutes of General Medical Sciences of the U.S. National Institutes of Health and from Penn State matching support.

Penn State has become the 55th educational institution in the nation to be certified as an affiliate of the Bee Campus USA program, designed to marshal the strength of educational campuses for the benefit of pollinators.IMAGE: PENN STATE

Penn State earns 'Bee Campus USA' certification

Penn State has become the 55th educational institution in the nation to be certified as an affiliate of the Bee Campus USA program, designed to marshal the strength of educational campuses for the benefit of pollinators. The University Park campus joins more than 100 other cities and campuses across the country united in improving their landscapes for pollinators.

Lizards increasingly rely on camouflage to avoid predators as you move southward across their range, but the presence of invasive fire ants reverses this pattern. IMAGE: LANGKILDE LAB, PENN STATE

Lizards quickly adapt to threat from invasive fire ants

Some lizards in the eastern U.S. have adapted to invasive fire ants — which can bite, sting and kill lizards — reversing geographical trends in behavioral and physical traits used to avoid predators.

A blue Acroporid coral in Lizard Island lagoon off the coast of Australia. New research shows that corals and their microbiomes have coevolved for hundreds of millions of years. IMAGE: F. JOSEPH POLLOCK, PENN STATE

Corals and their microbiomes evolved together

Corals and the microorganisms they host have evolved together for hundreds of millions of years. Understanding this long-term relationship could add fresh insight to the fight to save the Earth’s embattled coral reefs, the planet’s largest and most significant structures of biological origin.

Jordan Hughey has been awarded a scholarship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s Minority Ph.D. (MPHD) program.

BG Student Wins Sloan Foundation Scholarship

Jordan Hughey has added the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s Minority Ph.D. award to an impressive list of accolades.

Farmers in Angonia, Mozambique, happy with the performance of new varieties of common bean developed by an international partnership of plant scientists that included researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences, pose among plants in a bean field. Plant breeding field trials have been conducted with bean growers in multiple regions of the country in southeast Africa. IMAGE: JIMMY BURRIDGE

Penn State root research results in breeding of improved bean plants for Africa

In the culmination of more than a decade of research on root traits conducted by Penn State plant scientists, about three tons of seed for common bean plants specifically bred to thrive in the barren soils of Mozambique will be distributed there Dec. 11.

Katriona Shea Named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Katriona Shea Named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Katriona Shea, professor of biology and Alumni Professor in the Biological Sciences has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Jian Yang with Ph.D. student Chuying Ma displaying a bendable citrate-based material for bone repair. IMAGE: WALT MILLS / PENN STATE

Citrate-based biomaterial fuels bone healing with less rejection

A material based on a natural product of bones and citrus fruit, called citrate, provides the extra energy that stem cells need to form new bone tissue, according to a team of Penn State bioengineers.