The Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences

Neuroscience news

Please join us in congratulating Weile Chen (Ecology), Adwitia Dey (Integrative and Biomedical Physiology), Sarah Jefferson (Neuroscience), Yurika Matsui (Molecular, Cellular, and Integrative Biosciences), Bastian Minkenberg (Plant Biology), and William Turbitt (Integrative and Biomedical Physiology) on their accomplishments.
President Eric Barron's letter to the University community
Attention Huck Institutes Intercollege Graduate Degree Program (IGDP) chairs and faculty: The Huck Institutes is seeking nominations for exceptional graduate students to be highlighted on the Huck Institutes website and social media.
Over the past two years, the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences, with the assistance of members of Penn State’s Industrial/Organizational Psychology program, has built and implemented a developmental system for graduate students in the Intercollege Graduate Degree Programs (IGDPs) in the life sciences.
The Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences is pleased to announce this year’s recipients of Huck Graduate Research Innovation (GRI) Grants.
The Huck Institutes is now accepting research proposals from students for the 2016 Huck Graduate Research Innovation (GRI) Grants. The Huck GRI Grants succeed the 2015 Huck Graduate Dissertation Research Grants and 2014 Huck Institutes Graduate Enrichment Awards.
Penn State alumnus and philanthropist Charles H. “Skip” Smith has committed $5 million to advance the research of Gong Chen, professor of biology and the Verne M. Willaman Chair in Life Sciences in the Eberly College of Science.
Understanding how different levels of readers comprehend science texts is the focus of a nearly $1 million grant awarded to an interdisciplinary team of Penn State psychology and education researchers by the National Science Foundation.
The greater than three-fold increase in autism diagnoses among students in special education programs in the United States between 2000 and 2010 may be due in large part to the reclassification of individuals who previously would have been diagnosed with other intellectual disability disorders, according to new research led by Santhosh Girirajan.
Studying sea anemones' molecular nerve-signaling machinery, Tim Jegla finds that a burst of evolutionary innovation laid the foundation of our nervous systems more than half a billion years ago.
Maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation may prime offspring for weight gain and obesity later in life, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers, who looked at rats whose mothers consumed a high-fat diet and found that the offsprings' feeding controls and feelings of fullness did not function normally.
Huck-cofunded faculty researcher Song Tan is among the awardees.
Separating circulating cancer cells from blood cells for diagnostic, prognostic and treatment purposes may become much easier using an acoustic separation method and an inexpensive, disposable chip, according to a team of engineers.
Pushing promising new brain-repair research from the Gong Chen lab into clinical trials is the goal of a quick crowd-funding campaign that kicked off March 30.
New research led by by Tim Jegla shows that a burst of evolutionary innovation in the genes responsible for electrical communication among nerve cells in our brains occurred over 600 million years ago in a common ancestor of humans and the sea anemone.
The Huck Institutes are now soliciting applications for a second round of J. Lloyd Huck Dissertation Research Grants (previously known as Huck Graduate Enrichment Awards) -- giving exceptional Huck graduate students up to $5,000 to spend on their individual research projects.
Reka Albert, James Broach, Katherine Freeman, Eric Harvill, Susan McHale, and Rongling Wu are among the faculty awarded a distinguished professorship by the Penn State Office of the Vice Provost for Academic Affairs.
Powerful clues have been discovered about why the human immune system, metabolism, stress response, and other life functions are so different from those of the mouse.
Learning a new language changes your brain network both structurally and functionally, according to Penn State researchers.
Seizures and migraines have always been considered separate physiological events in the brain, but now a team of engineers and neuroscientists looking at the brain from a physics viewpoint discovered a link between these and related phenomena.

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