The Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences

Bioinformatics and Genomics News

$2.4M program is designed to train the next generation of biomedical scientists
President Eric Barron's letter to the University community
Attention Huck Institutes Intercollege Graduate Degree Program (IGDP) chairs and faculty: The Huck Institutes is seeking nominations for exceptional graduate students to be highlighted on the Huck Institutes website and social media.
Over the past two years, the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences, with the assistance of members of Penn State’s Industrial/Organizational Psychology program, has built and implemented a developmental system for graduate students in the Intercollege Graduate Degree Programs (IGDPs) in the life sciences.
The Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences is pleased to announce this year’s recipients of Huck Graduate Research Innovation (GRI) Grants.
Yin Tang, a graduate student in the Bioinformatics and Genomics program who is co-advised by Sally Assmann and Phil Bevilacqua, recently won a University of California, Berkeley Center for Computational Biology Outstanding Oral Poster Prize for his presentation at the Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) 2016 meeting in Orlando, Florida.
The Huck Institutes is now accepting research proposals from students for the 2016 Huck Graduate Research Innovation (GRI) Grants. The Huck GRI Grants succeed the 2015 Huck Graduate Dissertation Research Grants and 2014 Huck Institutes Graduate Enrichment Awards.
An $80,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), with matching support from the University, will fund five years of advanced training in data reproducibility and entrepreneurship.
The greater than three-fold increase in autism diagnoses among students in special education programs in the United States between 2000 and 2010 may be due in large part to the reclassification of individuals who previously would have been diagnosed with other intellectual disability disorders, according to new research led by Santhosh Girirajan.
The Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences is pleased to announce the recipients of the Huck Dissertation Research Grants for 2015.
The discovery of a gene involved in determining the melting point of cocoa butter -- a critical attribute of the substance widely used in foods and pharmaceuticals -- will likely lead to new and improved products, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.
Research project, with George Perry, on Eastern mountain lion uses ancient DNA sample from 'Original Nittany Lion'
NSF award will provide funding for Medvedev to develop algorithms for big genomic data
The Huck Institutes are now soliciting applications for a second round of J. Lloyd Huck Dissertation Research Grants (previously known as Huck Graduate Enrichment Awards) -- giving exceptional Huck graduate students up to $5,000 to spend on their individual research projects.
Reka Albert, James Broach, Katherine Freeman, Eric Harvill, Susan McHale, and Rongling Wu are among the faculty awarded a distinguished professorship by the Penn State Office of the Vice Provost for Academic Affairs.
Marylyn Ritchie, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology and director of the Center for Systems Genomics in the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences at Penn State University, will lead a collaborative effort between Penn State and Geisinger Research to connect the genome data of 100,000 anonymous patients with their medical histories, in order to identify the genetic and environmental basis of human disease.
Inhibiting a nuclear receptor in the gut could lead to a treatment for a liver disorder that affects almost 30 percent of the Western world's adult population, according to an international team of researchers.
Manuel Llinás, a Huck-cofunded researcher and associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State has been awarded two years of Phase II funding for a Grand Challenges Exploration Grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
New genetic research reveals that a small group of hunter-gatherers now living in Southern Africa once was so large that it comprised the majority of living humans during most of the past 150,000 years.
Powerful clues have been discovered about why the human immune system, metabolism, stress response, and other life functions are so different from those of the mouse.

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