The Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences

News Archive

Modern brain circuitry retains ancient foundation

Studying sea anemones' molecular nerve-signaling machinery, Tim Jegla finds that a burst of evolutionary innovation laid the foundation of our nervous systems more than half a billion years ago.

 

By Seth Palmer
June 12, 2015

 

Comb jelly epidermal nerve cells (at right, in red). Credit: Tim Jegla Lab, Penn State.

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Tree root research confirms that different morphologies produce similar results

Despite markedly different root morphologies and resulting disparities in nutrient-uptake processes, forest trees of different lineages show comparable efficiency in acquiring soil nutrients, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

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Unlocking the biofuel energy stored in plant cell walls

Penn State scientists are studying how plant cell walls are made, information that could lead to better ways of harvesting the energy stored in their chemical bonds.

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Anthropologist receives $1.84 million to study craniofacial malformations

Penn State will receive $1.84 million over five years as a subcontract on a National Institutes of Health grant through the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, N.Y., to explore craniosynostosis, a birth defect that includes facial and cranial dysmorphology.

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Huck student helps advance breakthrough using award funds

Plant Biology doctoral candidate Bastian Minkenberg, a Huck Graduate Research Dissertation Award winner, worked to help advance the recent genome-editing breakthrough in Yinong Yang’s lab using funds from his award.

 

By Seth Palmer

May 28, 2015

 

Bastian Minkenberg takes a leaf tissue sample from a rice plant.

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Announcing 2015 Biotechnology Mini Grant Awardees

The Huck Institutes are pleased to announce the recipients of our 2015 Biotechnology Mini Grants.

Please join us in congratulating the following individuals:

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Chronic illness causes less harm when carnivores cooperate

Gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park have given researchers the first scientific evidence from wild mammals that living in a group can lessen the impacts of a chronic disease.

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Study shows how E. Coli thrive in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

The survival and proliferation of usually harmless Escherichia coli in the gut of inflammatory bowel disease patients may now be better understood, as researchers have defined a fundamental mechanism through which the bacteria can thrive during flare-ups.

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Announcing the 27th Annual Conference of the North American Biotechnology Council (NABC)

Announcing the 27th Annual Conference of the North American Biotechnology Council (NABC): "Stewardship for the Sustainability of Genetically Engineered Crops: The Way Forward in Pest Management, Coexistence, and Trade"

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Mother's diet influences weight-control neurocircuits in offspring

Maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation may prime offspring for weight gain and obesity later in life, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers, who looked at rats whose mothers consumed a high-fat diet and found that the offsprings' feeding controls and feelings of fullness did not function normally.

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Researchers discover gene that controls melting point of cocoa butter

The discovery of a gene involved in determining the melting point of cocoa butter -- a critical attribute of the substance widely used in foods and pharmaceuticals -- will likely lead to new and improved products, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

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Dream to provide science supplies in Africa wins $7,500 Ag Springboard top prize

Bridge the GapSci -- a nonprofit venture by Huck graduate students Kerry Belton (Molecular Toxicology), Jamaal James (Molecular Medicine), Shawntawnee Collins (Immunology and Infectious Disease), Sarah Owusu (Physiology), and Josephine Garban (Molecular Medicine) -- won the $7,500 grand prize in the Ag Springboard student business pitch competition.

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Schreyer Scholar Evanitsky studies past with hopes of preserving the future

Research project, with George Perry, on Eastern mountain lion uses ancient DNA sample from 'Original Nittany Lion'

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Five Penn State professors honored with Faculty Scholar Medals

Huck-cofunded faculty researcher Song Tan is among the awardees.

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Disease spread through ants

David Hughes talks about studying disease spread through ants.

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Sound separates cancer cells from blood samples

Separating circulating cancer cells from blood cells for diagnostic, prognostic and treatment purposes may become much easier using an acoustic separation method and an inexpensive, disposable chip, according to a team of engineers.

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Crowd-funding campaign to accelerate clinical trials of brain-repair discovery

Pushing promising new brain-repair research from the Gong Chen lab into clinical trials is the goal of a quick crowd-funding campaign that kicked off March 30.

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Honey bees use multiple genetic pathways to fight infections

Honey bees use different sets of genes, regulated by two distinct mechanisms, to fight off viruses, bacteria and gut parasites, according to researchers at Penn State and the Georgia Institute of Technology. The findings may help scientists develop honey bee treatments that are tailored to specific types of infections.

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Researcher develops novel strategy to improve crops and treat diseases

A novel strategy to enhance genome editing promises to increase the efficiency of making genetic improvements in a wide range of organisms, a new study suggests.

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Paul Medvedev receives National Science Foundation CAREER award

NSF award will provide funding for Medvedev to develop algorithms for big genomic data

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