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Ecology

Ecology

Covering basic and applied aspects of ecology, with research and teaching ranging from the molecular to the biosphere level

Program overview

Ecologists study how organisms interact with each other and with their environments.

Penn State's Intercollege Graduate Degree Program in Ecology:

  • Provides students with a sound understanding of ecological theory and hypothesis testing
  • Complements other Penn State environmental programs that emphasize the role of humans in ecosystems
  • Offers options to take courses and undertake research in a variety of ecological areas, from the molecular to the biosphere level
  • Offers both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. M.S. degree requirements are usually completed within two years. The Ph.D. degree requires three or more years of research beyond the M.S. level. B.S. level applicants with good academic records who have had strong training in ecology and related courses, including research experience, are encouraged to apply directly to the Ph.D. program.

Program faculty

The program involves more than 50 faculty working in a range of disciplines, including:

Study systems include

Faculty Spotlight
Assistant Professor of Geography
News
Penn State is hosting 22 new National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) recipients for the 2014-15 academic year. Penn State hosts new National Science Foundation graduate researchers - Full article
A parasitic fungus that reproduces by manipulating the behavior of ants emits a cocktail of behavior-controlling chemicals when encountering the brain of its natural target host, but not when infecting other ant species, a new study shows. Zombie ant fungi 'know' brains of their hosts - Full article
The small body size associated with the pygmy phenotype is probably a selective adaptation for rainforest hunter-gatherers, according to an international team of researchers that includes Huck Institutes faculty scientist George Perry, but all African pygmy phenotypes do not have the same genetic underpinning, suggesting a more recent adaptation than previously thought. Pygmy phenotype developed many times, adaptive to rainforest - Full article