Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools
Sections
Home / Centers of Excellence / Center for Brain, Behavior and Cognition

Center for Brain, Behavior and Cognition

Center for Brain, Behavior and Cognition

Bringing together researchers from a broad range of disciplines — including psychology, biology, entomology, physics and engineering — to explore how neural processes underpin animal and human cognition and behavior

The Center also offers education and training to graduate students and postdoctoral scholars through courses and seminars at Penn State.

Recent publications
Researchers use fMRI and state-of-the-art brain mapping techniques to study alcohol's effects on first-year students The team, which includes several scientists affiliated with the Huck Institutes, recently completed a first-of-its-kind longitudinal pilot study aimed at better understanding how the neural processes that underlie responses to alcohol-related cues change across students' first year of college.
Ping Li co-authors "Having Success with NSF: A Practical Guide" The guide is designed to help researchers achieve success in getting their National Science Foundation (NSF) research proposals funded.
Zombie-ant fungus is under attack by hyperparasites An international research team led by Penn State professor and Huck Institutes researcher David Hughes has discovered that hyperparasitic fungi — which are not pathogens of ants — infect the zombie-ant fungi and significantly limit the viability of their spore-producing organs, thus reducing the danger posed to the colony.
News
An international team of researchers that includes Huck Institutes affiliates Tom Baker and Missy Hazen has designed decoys that mimic female emerald ash borer beetles and successfully entice male emerald ash borers to land on them in an attempt to mate, only to be electrocuted and killed by high-voltage current. "Femme fatale" emerald ash borer decoy lures and kills males - Full article
A parasitic fungus that reproduces by manipulating the behavior of ants emits a cocktail of behavior-controlling chemicals when encountering the brain of its natural target host, but not when infecting other ant species, a new study shows. Zombie ant fungi 'know' brains of their hosts - Full article
A parasitic fungus that must kill its ant hosts outside their nest to reproduce and transmit its infection, manipulates its victims to die in the vicinity of the colony, ensuring a constant supply of potential new hosts, according to researchers at Penn State and colleagues at Brazil's Federal University of Vicosa. Zombie ant fungi manipulate hosts to die on the 'doorstep' of the colony - Full article
Events
Sep 24, 2014 Wednesday 4:00 PM
Eric A. Newman (University of Minnesota)
Conversations Between Glial Cells, Neurons, and Blood Vessels in the Normal and Diabetic Retina
Oct 8, 2014 Wednesday 4:00 PM
Hui Zheng (Baylor College of Medicine)
Neuro-Glia Signaling in Neuronal Health and Alzheimer's Disease
Oct 15, 2014 Wednesday 4:00 PM
Gregory J. Quirk (University of Puerto Rico, School of Medicine)
Prefrontal-amygdala Circuits in Fear and Avoidance: The View from Puerto Rico
Oct 22, 2014 Wednesday 4:00 PM
Ming-Hu Han (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)
Cellular and Circuitry Mechanisms Underlying Behavioral Resilience to Social Stress
Oct 29, 2014 Wednesday 4:00 PM
Kyung-An Han (University of Texas at El Paso)
Title to be announced